"To study the world of the ancient Greeks and Romans is to study people and events from more than 2000 years ago, and yet we are hard pressed to find much in our daily lives--be it language, government, literature, art--that does not owe in some way to these fascinating cultures."

— Michael Dougherty '93, Department Chair, Classics

Classics

Click here for a Classics Year by Year Table

FreshmanSophomoreJuniorSenior
  • Latin I
  • Honors Latin I
  • Latin II
  • Honors Latin II
  • Honors Latin II/Greek I
  • Latin III
  • AP Latin
  • Honors Greek II
  • Rome: From Romulus to Caesar (Fall)
  • Rome: From Augustus to Constantine (Spring)
  • Ancient Tragedy (Fall)
  • Ancient Comedy (Spring)
  • Latin IV
  • Honors Latin IV
  • Honors Greek III
  • Classical Mythology & Archaeology
  • Rome: From Romulus to Caesar (Fall)
  • Rome: From Augustus to Constantine (Spring)
  • Ancient Tragedy (Fall)
  • Ancient Comedy (Spring)

 

CLA 101 - Latin 1

This course provides a detailed study of elementary Latin grammar and vocabulary. Students develop skills of memory, analysis, and association. Attention is given to the translation of stories in "made-up" Latin. Connections with English grammar and vocabulary are frequently indicated. [Students take the National Latin Exam.]

Prerequisite
None

CLA 102 - Honors Latin I

This course attempts to group those students with identifiably high verbal skills. While the matter covered is the same as that in Latin I, the depth, pace, and amount of translation go beyond that of the regular course. [Students take the National Latin Exam.]

Prerequisite
Placement based on Scholarship-Entrance Examination and qualifying exams in verbal skills.

CLA 201 - Latin II

This course first reviews material learned in Latin I; then, new grammar is presented sequentially. Students use a review vocabulary prepared by the Department and begin to read original Latin selections taken from Caesar and/or Livy. Cultural and historical aspects of ancient Rome are also explored. [Students take the National Latin Exam.]

Required
(or CLA 202 /
CLA 203 )

Prerequisite
CLA 101 or
CLA 102

CLA 202 - Honors Latin II

This course is open to those students who have developed a serious interest in the language, history, and culture of ancient Rome. Students must have demonstrated superior ability in translating complex Latin, as well as in memorizing and identifying the grammatical elements learned in Latin I. Students in this course complete the same syllabus offered in Latin II, but do so at a quicker pace and with greater attention to the most complex aspects of the language. Students at the honors level can also expect to translate a greater number of passages than their peers in Latin II. [Students take the National Latin Exam.]

Prerequisite
CLA 101 or
CLA 102

Recommendation of first-year Latin teacher and approval of the Department Chairperson.

CLA 203 - Honors Latin II / Greek I

This intensive course, which combines the introductory study of Attic Greek with the completion of the entire syllabus of Latin II, is open only to highly qualified students who have a serious interest in ancient languages and history. Students who enroll in this course are expected to continue their study of ancient Greek in the following year (Honors Greek II). [Students take both the National Latin Exam and the National Greek Exam.

Prerequisite
CLA 101 or
CLA 102

Recommendation of first-year Latin teacher and approval of the Department Chairperson.

CLA 301 - Summer Latin III

This course is designed for students who wish to complete a third course in Latin during the summer. It is identical in design to the yearlong Latin III course, but students read extensively from the works of only one author (either prose or poetry). This is a terminal course, and students who complete it will not be permitted to continue their study of the language in Latin IV or Honors Latin IV.

Prerequisite
CLA 201 or
CLA 202 or
CLA 203

CLA 301 - Latin III

This course offers students their first opportunity to read extensively from the corpus of Latin literature. The first term is devoted to the study of Latin prose. Students typically read selections from the works of Caesar and/or Cicero. The second term is devoted to the study of Latin poetry. Students may read selections from Vergil or Ovid, depending on the interests of the teacher/Department. In both terms, relevant historical and cultural topics are addressed, as are features of literary style. [Students take the National Latin Exam.]

Prerequisite
CLA 201 or
CLA 202 or
CLA 203

CLA 302 - AP Latin

This course follows the syllabus set by the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board for a close reading of prescribed passages from the Aeneid, the epic poem by Vergil, and from De Bello Gallico, the commentaries by Caesar. Students develop linguistic skills by translating poetry and prose precisely and literally, reading with comprehension, and analyzing literary texts in coherent arguments supported by textual examples. [Students are required to take the AP Examination in May and the National Latin Examination.]

Prerequisite
CLA 201 or
CLA 202 or
CLA 203

Recommendation of second-year Latin teacher and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 303 - Honors Greek II

This course, in which students complete the study of Greek grammar, is open to those students who have successfully completed Honors Latin II/Greek I. Selections from Attic prose and poetry of the fifth century BCE are read in the original. Texts covered are set and studied within their appropriate contexts. Cultural, historical, and archaeological topics are often explored and discussed. [Students take the National Greek Exam.]

Prerequisite
CLA 203

Recommendation of first-year Greek teacher and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 402 - Classical Mythology and Archaeology

This course consists of two related parts. The first term involves an examination of Greco-Roman mythology. Students study the various gods of the Roman pantheon, the literary tradition that details their exploits, and their function in the religion and daily lives of the Romans. Frequent correlations to other world religions, especially Christianity, are explored. In the second term, students study general principles and select topics of classical architecture and archaeology, which they then apply to a detailed study of the physical remains of Rome and its environs. Slide lectures elucidate the major monuments of the city. Students consider, among other things, the topography of Rome itself, the Roman conception of urban planning, and Roman socio-political and religious history. This course, which is open to seniors only, is a free elective that does not satisfy the departmental language requirement.

Prerequisite
CLA 201 or
CLA 202 or
CLA 203

Successful completion of Latin through Latin II and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 403 - Honors Greek III

This course presents an in-depth reading of authors selected by the teacher/Department. Connections are made between the text and the archaeology, history, and mythology of ancient Greece. Background readings from secondary sources are used to enhance the classroom experience. [Students take the National Greek Exam.

Prerequisite
CLA 303

Recommendation of second-year Greek teacher and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 404 - Latin IV

This course, like Latin III, offers students the opportunity to read Latin authors in the original. Students read selections from writers of the late Republic and Empire. Authors and texts are determined by the teacher/Department. Relevant historical and cultural topics are addressed and discussed. [Students take the National Latin Exam.

Prerequisite
CLA 301 or
CLA 302

CLA 405 - Honors Latin IV

This course, which follows the syllabus formerly prescribed by the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board (AP Latin Lyric Poetry), offers students the opportunity to read extensively from the poetry of Catullus and Horace. Students can expect the workload and class experience to be similar to that of an author-level course at the university level. Class work requires close reading of the text, and students are expected to analyze critically in linguistic and literary terms. Correlations between the literature and culture of Greece and Rome are explored, at times in great detail. Scholarly articles may be used to supplement analysis of particular poems. [Students take the National Latin Exam.]

Prerequisite
CLA 301 or
CLA 302

Recommendation of third-year Latin teacher and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 501 - Rome: From Romulus to Caesar (Fall) - 1/2 Credit

This semester-long course introduces students to the history of Rome from its foundations as a village to its rise as a world power through the end of the Republic. The focus of the course is literary, and students deal directly with the primary sources (in English translation) that present the ancient perspective of the periods under consideration. Significant attention is also paid to the archaeological, artistic, numismatic, and epigraphical evidence that scholars use to recreate the history of the city and its people. This course, which is open to both juniors and seniors, is a free elective that does not satisfy the Departmental language requirement.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin through Latin II and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 502 - Rome: From Augustus to Constantine (Spring) - 1/2 Credit

This semester-long course introduces students to the history of Rome as an empire, during which period its cultural, governmental, and military influence spread throughout the entire Mediterranean world. The focus of the course is literary, and students deal directly with the primary sources (in English translation) that present the ancient perspective of the periods under consideration. Significant attention is also paid to the archaeological, artistic, numismatic, and epigraphical evidence that scholars use to recreate the personalities of the emperors and the impact of Roman government and culture on conquered peoples. This course, which is open to both juniors and seniors, is a free elective that does not satisfy the Departmental language requirement.

Prerequisite
CLA 201 or
CLA 202 or
CLA 203

Successful completion of Latin through Latin II and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 503 - Ancient Tragedy (Fall) - 1/2 Credit

This semester-long course introduces students to some of the greatest works of Greek and Roman Tragedy. The focus of the course is literary, and students deal directly with the primary sources (in English translation) to consider the social, political, religious, and artistic functions of ancient drama in Greece and Rome. Students also consider ancient tragedy’s similarities to and differences from modern dramatic representation. Secondary readings, guest lectures, and reconstructions/adaptations of the texts increase breadth and depth of student understanding. This course, which is open to both juniors and seniors, is a free elective that does not satisfy the Departmental language requirement.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin through Latin II and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 504 - Ancient Comedy (Spring) - 1/2 Credit

This semester-long course introduces students to some of the greatest works of Greek and Roman Tragedy. The focus of the course is literary, and students deal directly with the primary sources (in English translation) to consider the social, political, religious, and artistic functions of ancient drama in Greece and Rome. Students also consider ancient comedy’s similarities to and differences from modern dramatic representation. Secondary readings, guest lectures, and reconstructions/adaptations of the texts increase breadth and depth of student understanding. This course, which is open to both juniors and seniors, is a free elective that does not satisfy the Departmental language requirement.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin through Latin II and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 505 - Roman Archaeology & Topography - 1/2 credit

This semester-long course offers students the opportunity to study the archaeology, architecture, topography, and, to a lesser extent, art of Classical Rome. Students initially study the general principles and select topics of classical archaeology and architecture, which they then apply to a detailed study of the physical remains of Rome and its environs. Slide lectures elucidate the major monuments of the city. Students consider, among other things, the topography of Rome itself, the Roman conception of urban planning, and Roman socio-political and religious history. This course, which is open to both juniors and seniors, is a free elective that does not satisfy the departmental language requirement.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin through Latin II and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 506 - Classical Mythology - 1/2 credit

This semester-long course offers students the opportunity to study the mythology and to survey some of the major myth cycles of the Greco-Roman world. Students study the various gods of the Greco-Roman pantheon, the literary tradition that details their exploits, and their function in the religion and daily lives of the ancients. Students also get the opportunity to read in translation large portions of major myths/myth cycles (Iliad, Metamorphoses, Theogony, among others) and to consider the transmission of these stories via material culture/visual arts (pottery, sculpture, fresco). In addition, correlations with other world religions, especially Christianity, are explored. This course, which is open to both juniors and seniors, is a free elective that does not satisfy the departmental language requirement.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin through Latin II and approval of Department Chairperson.

CLA 507 - Athenian Democracy - 1/2 credit

This semester-long course guides students through the emergence and development of the Athenian democracy from the 6th to the 4th centuries BCE. Students engage in the close reading, analysis, and discussion of ancient literature in English translation. By reading from a wide variety of source material, students gain an appreciation for the politics, military affairs, arts, and culture of ancient Athens, with particular attention paid to how the institutions of democracy governed the polis during both peace and war. Students consider both the ancient democracy of Athens and the reception of Athenian ideas during other periods of history, including the modern era. The course also dedicates special attention to the role of Aristophanic comedy in the democracy of Athens, with discussion of what role various media play in our own society and the importance of free speech with regard to political debate. This course, which is open to Juniors and Seniors only, is a free elective and does not satisfy the departmental language requirement.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin through Latin II and approval of Department Chairperson.

St. Joseph's Preparatory School
1733 West Girard Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19130
tel: 215.978.1950
fax: 215.765.1710
powered by finalsite